Leadership Philosophy (Part 3)

Leadership Philosophy (Part 3)

A leadership philosophy is instrumental in how we lead others.  It doesn’t need to be a formal document, just a set of beliefs, guidelines and experiences that drive your individual style, one that effectively leads people to success.  We’ve been through the first 4 tenets of my leadership philosophy, so lets wrap this up with 5 and 6:

5.  Situational leadership: A one-size-fits-all approach to leading your people is not going to make them productive, nor will they be satisfied with your relationship. People are different and dynamic—they have varied strengths and areas for improvement. Because of this, people should be managed in a way that will bring the best out of them so that it will enhance the team effort. This doesn’t mean that a leader should be unpredictable. Rather, the leader should manage to the strengths and personalities of each direct report. From this mindset, the leader has great flexibility in how he or she interacts and motivates each member of the team. Values and core beliefs of the leader and the team should be clear.

Leadership Philosophy (Part 2)

Leadership Philosophy (Part 2)

Last month, we framed the first part of my leadership philosophy. Here is a summary of the first three tenets from last month’s blog:

1. Own your lane, and know your people’s lanes.
2. Have a servant attitude.
3. Have a vision for change and embrace change even when you didn’t have the vision.

Now let’s dig into and unpack the next tenet:

4. All-embracing communication: This is the most important leadership tenet, because if you are not effectively communicating, your people won’t have a clear picture of their lanes; they won’t see that you have a servant attitude; and they won’t buy into your vision.

Leadership Philosophy (Part 1)

Leadership Philosophy (Part 1)

As leaders in the marketplace, our churches, and our communities, many of us have “leadership philosophies” (LP)—systems that inform our direct reports and cross-functional teams what we believe, how we are going to act, and what we expect from ourselves and everybody else. My LP has been the patchwork of many great leaders. In other words, there’s not one original part of my leadership philosophy. But it is unique in that I have cherry-picked from some of the best and made it my own. Without further ado, here is the first part of my LP:

Note: Integrity, trust, and performance/results are non-negotiables and will be by-products of the following six tenets:

  1. Own your lane, and know his/her lane. Simply stated, instill a mindset of accountability, attention to detail, and reliability in your people. Each person is responsible for his or her responsibilities on the job. Bottom line: How do those responsibilities dovetail and impact the rest of the unit or organization. This is where an autonomous spirit coalesces with collaborating teamwork.